Get a GREAT DEAL on SUPERIOR VETERINARY TRAINING

Sign up now for the full-day, Pre-Conference Veterinary Training – Medical Ozone and Biophotonic Therapy at SOPMed 2015, on Thursday, June 25, and get a $195 discount on the cost of the main Conference.

But this isn’t just a great deal, it’s also training you cannot afford to miss whether you are new to alternative photonic and oxidative therapies or need a top-notch refresher course. Everyone interested in integrative veterinary medicine will benefit from the in-depth session beginning with an overview of ozone and biophotonic therapy in a classroom setting and continuing in the wet labs with hands-on instruction using live animals. This intensive course will be taught by Dr. Kathy Backus and Jon Lowe and will run from 9:00 am until 5:00 pm.

Following the pre-Conference training, the main Conference on Friday and Saturday, June 26-27, offers a broad range of Lectures and General Sessions by renowned experts on subjects as diverse as medical lights and lasers, redox signaling and business success, to name just a few.

On Saturday veterinarians will spend the afternoon with four of the nation’s top alternative veterinarians discussing areas of special interest, including:

• Margo Roman, DVM – Ozone in Micro-Biome Restorative Therapy and Prolozone Therapy
• Betsy Hershey, DVM – O3UV in Oncology
• Kathy Backus, DVM – Pulsed Electro Magnetic Fields (PEMF)
• Rachel Jones, DVM – O3 Case Studies

And then there is the venue itself, Snowbird, Utah, one of the nation’s premiere skiing destinations is also a summertime haven for outdoor enthusiasts who enjoy activities like hiking, biking, horseback riding, and gondola rides through the breathtaking mountains and valleys. Others may want to treat themselves to a little R & R and pampering courtesy of the Cliff Lodge Spa where SOPMed attendees get a 50% discount on services and amenities including, a relaxing solarium, full-service salon, eucalyptus steam room, dry sauna, yoga room, rooftop lap pool, and an extensive fitness gym.

So take advantage of this great opportunity to get excellent training at an excellent price at SOPMed 2015 in Snowbird Utah, June 25 – 27, 2015. Contact us at info@sopvet.com for discount registration information and check out www.sopmed.org to learn more about the entire Conference.

O3Vets.com is a young and innovative company with the goal of helping alternative and integrative veterinarians understand and use oxidative therapies in their daily practices. One way to accomplish this is to begin a dialogue about these therapies, the science behind them, the practitioners that use them, and the outcomes that will serve to educate and enlighten veterinarians and pet owners alike.

That said…Welcome to the O3Vets blog!

It is our hope that this blog will be a venue for diverse information sharing, from answering equipment-related questions to interviews with integrative practitioners to news and upcoming events. While we will do our best to keep it fresh and informative, we also welcome your ideas, interests and suggestions at info@o3vets.com.

But wait, there’s more!

In addition to this blog, we are also providing an online forum where practitioners can network, converse and give and get answers to their medical questions. We want you to feel free to make this forum your peer-to-peer place to go for intelligent, insightful and lively discussions about oxidative therapies and how they improve quality of care. Periodically, we will also contribute to the forum as needed or requested.

Another service we are working on is a newsletter, which will provide the means for further developing some of the issues and topics that come up in the blog and the forum, and others that require more space to address properly. Again, we are always open to your ideas and suggestions so do not hesitate to drop us a line at info@O3vets.com and let us know what’s on your mind.

And last but not least, we also would like to invite veterinarians that use ozone in their practices to take advantage of the O3Vets Practitioners map, which is on our web site o3vets.com and available to the public, worldwide. Simply go to O3Vets.com, click on the “Practitioners” tab and fill out the brief form. That’s all it takes and as soon as possible we will “put your practice on the map.”

Thank you for stopping by. We look forward to learning, sharing and growing with you!

Ozone was discovered in 1785 by Dutch physicist Martinus Van Marum, who smelled a peculiar sent which was being made near electrostatic machines. It was later synthesized, and in 1857 the first Ozone insufflations were tested on animals and humans. Since then, it has spread all across the world for many different purposes. Ozone therapy has a long history and many scientific studies performed to back up its validity.

Russia has recognized ozone therapy on a state level for medical use as well as for dermatological purposes!  According to the Ministry of Public Health in Cuba, ozone therapy has been applied all throughout the country since 2009.

Altogether, there are over 26,000 ozone therapists throughout the world. With wide acceptance, many studies, and numerous practitioners, we have learned a great deal about how to use ozone.

There are a variety of ways in which ozone therapy can be administered to the patient. How do you know which one to use? In the following blog posts, I will be going over the different methods of applying ozone. In this one, however, I am going to be giving you an overview of all of them.

Major Autohemotherapy

Major autohaemotherapy calls for the 10-250 ml of the patient’s blood to be drawn out. Ozone is then injected into the blood and the ozonated blood is re-introduced into a vein. These methods have been used to treat a wide variety of health problems. It is probably the most commonly used method of administration for ozone therapy today.

Minor Autohemotherapy

Minor autohaemotherapy involves using a syringe to remove a small amount of the patient’s blood from a vein with a syringe. The blood is then treated with an equal amount of ozone and given back to the patient as an intramuscular or subcutaneous injection. The blood and ozone becomes a type of auto-vaccine, which can be very specific and effective.

Direct intra-arterial and intravenous application (DIV)

An ozone/oxygen mixture is slowly injected into an artery or vein with a hypodermic syringe. Though not recommended by many within the ozone therapy world due to the danger of creating an embolism, this method is used primarily for arterial circulatory disorders.

Insufflation

Ozone is applied through the rectum and absorbed into the body through the intestine. Used for a wide variety of health problems, this method is considered one of the safest.

Ozonated water

This method calls for ozone gas to be bubbled through distilled water or saline.  The water is used externally to bathe wounds, burns and slow-healing skin infections.

Intra-articular injection (prolozone)

In this method, a specific mixture of procaine, vitamins, minerals and homeopathic remedies are injected directly into the joints. Ozone is also injected to the same site. It is used primarily by physicians throughout the world to treat joint pain, herniated discs, arthritis, and other joint diseases.

Intramammary infusion 

Instead of antibiotics, this can be very effective for mastitis in large animals.  The lack of side effects or residue in animals such as dairy cows makes it a perfect choice as it will not affect the quality of their milk as an antibiotic would.  

Limb bagging

This non-invasive method uses a specially made plastic bag that is placed around the area to be treated. Ozone is pumped into the bag and absorbed into the body through the skin.

Ozonated oil

Used primarily to treat skin problems, ozone gas is added to olive, hemp, sunflower or other oils and applied as a balm or salve for long term, low-dose exposure. Studies show a more rapid healing effect. 

Inhalation of ozone

Ozone can be bubbled through olive oil and the resulting atomized oil/ozone mix can be safely inhaled

You’ll want to watch out for our next blog which will be going over the differences between major and minor autohemotherapy.